Monday, May 04, 2015

Cites & Insights 15:6 (June 2015) available

Cites & Insights 15:6 (June 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i6.pdf

The print-oriented two-column version is 24 pages long. For those reading online or on an e-device, or who wish to follow links in the issue, a 46-page single-column 6x9" version is available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i6on.pdf

The June 2015 issue includes:

The Front: Making It Easy, Making It Hard: A Personal Note on Counting Articles pp. 1-4

This oddity offers some notes on OA publishers and journals that make it easier--or harder--than usual to find out how many articles appear in a journal over a given year, from the utter simplicity of MDPI, SciELO and j-stage to the utter...well, read the article.

Intersections: Who Needs Open Access, Anyway? pp. 4-24

Noting and discussing a range of commentaries by people who are either "I'm all for OA, but..." (where the but is the most important word in that phrase) or discussing ways in which others attempt to undermine OA: clearing out two years of "oa-anti" tags.

Monday, April 06, 2015

Cites & Insights 15.5 (May 2015) available

The May 2015 Cites & Insights (15:5) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i5.pdf

The 2-column print-oriented version is 24 pages long.

 If you're reading it online or on an e-reader (tablet, etc.), or if you want working links, you may prefer the one-column 6x9" version (46 pages long), available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i5on.pdf This issue includes:

The Front: The Open Access Landscape pp. 1-3

Notes on the series of blog posts that began in early March 2015 and will continue through either mid-September or mid-November; the potential book that would combine those posts and add new material; and the possibility of a five-year longitudinal study of the state of gold OA (2011-2015) in 2016, if funding becomes available.

Libraries: FriendFeed, Going. LSW, Not. pp. 3-10

An elegy (of sorts) for FriendFeed, scheduled to disappear on April 9 (unless Facebook listens to InfoWorld and others and lets it keep going)--and to the Library Society of the World, which in its own informal way has meant so much to me and many others.

Social Networks: Slightly More Than 140 Characters Words Sentences Paragraphs About Twitter pp. 10-19

A possibly-amusing set of mostly-old musings by others about Twitter's inevitable decline and fall, certainly gone by now, and the decline of Western civilization--also why it's nothing but a note-taking system and the need for balance.

The Back pp. 19-24

Ten brief (and some not-so-brief) rants and amusements.

Sunday, March 01, 2015

Cites & Insights 15:4 (April 2015) available

Cites & Insights 15:4 (April 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i4.pdf

The print-oriented version is 38 pages long; it includes boldface as applied but the links don't work.

If you're reading online or on an e-device and want working links (but no boldface), you may prefer the single-column 6x9" version at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i4on.pdf

The single-column version is 72 pages long.

This issue includes the following:

Intersections: The Economies of Open Access pp. 1-38

Publishing costs money. That's a given, although sometimes that cost is so negligible that it can be handled as departmental or library or society overhead. This roundup looks at a range of items related to the economics of journals in general and OA journals in particular, divided into ten general topics. It turns out that I have stronger feelings than I thought about this issue, so there's a fair amount of my own commentary mixed in with excerpts from various posts and articles.

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

Cites & Insights 15:3 (March 2015) available

Cites & Insights 15:3 (March 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i3.pdf

The issue is 24 pages long.

If you plan to view it online or need working hyperlinks (at the expense of boldface working--someday, I'll have a new computer and new version of Word's PDF conversion and Acrobat), the single-column 6x9" version, 46 pages long, is available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i3on.pdf

This issue includes the following:

Intersections: One More Chunk of DOAJ pp. 1-10

Because there will be a published concise version of all this stuff--out this summer from ALA's Library Technology Reports, working title "Idealism and Opportunism: The State of Open Access Journals"--I went through 2,200-odd additional DOAJ journals with English as one of the language options (but not the first one), and was able to add 1,507 more entries to my DOAJ master spreadsheet, which now includes 6,490 journals qualifying for full analysis and 811 that don't.

This essay offers some summary information on the 1,507 added journals and some overall notes on the full DOAJ set--including some new and replacement tables (there may be errors in tables 2.66 b and c and 2.67 b and c in earlier issues).

The essay also offers some details on "N" (not OA) journals, notes on very small journals, a few comments on opportunism, idealism and initiative--and the URLs for two spreadsheets offering anonymized versions of the DOAJ and Beall data.

(Note that the DOAJ spreadsheet has just been changed to shift 580 "B" journals there because of $1,000-or-more APCs to a new "A$" subgrade, since the high APC was the only issue with them. The summary text in this issue has NOT been changed to reflect this refinement; the Library Technology Reports issue will reflect the change.)

The two spreadsheeets are on figshare and licensed with the Creative Commons "BY" license, making them available for any use as long as attribution is provided. Each spreadsheet includes a data key as a second page.

Words: Books, E and P, 2014 pp. 10-24

Bringing discussions of ebooks vs. (or and) pbooks up to date from the January 2014 essay. In most cases, "and" is now the prevailing attitude as ebook sales appear to have plateaued--although of course there are still those who say print books will die Because Digital and now, oddly, a few who say ebooks will die or are dead (which I regard as equally unlikely).

Sunday, January 04, 2015

Cites & Insights 15.2 (February 2015) available

Cites & Insights 15.2 (February 2015) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i2.pdf

The two-column print-oriented version (with non-working links but with boldface) is 24 pages long.

A single-column 6x9" version optimized for online viewing and with working hyperlinks (but without boldface), 46 pages long, is available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i2on.pdf

For those of you tired of open access facts and figures, this issue has less than half a page (on page 3) devoted to open access.

The issue includes:

The Front pp. 1-3

Notes on readership, 2014. Also a few notes on "the fourth half," partially likely to appear in the March 2015 issue.

The Middle: Deathwatch 2014! pp. 3-15

That's right! After a one-year hiatus, it's time for another Deathwatch, and this one does include a few death of books/death of libraries items.

Policy: ©: Going to Extremes pp. 15-24

Starting with 69 citations on copyright extremism (from both sides), this roundup includes two dozen items that still seemed worth noting.

Tuesday, December 02, 2014

Cites & Insights 15:1 (January 2015) available

The January 2015 issue of Cites & Insights (15:1) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i1.pdf

The print-oriented two-column version is 28 pages long.

If you're reading online or on an e-device, you may prefer the single-column 6"x9" version, which is 57 pages long.

The issue includes:

Intersections: The Third Half pp. 1-21

Most of this essay (pp. 7-19) is the "Third Half" of the two-part Journals and "Journals" examination in the October/November and December 2014 issues--adding another 1,200-odd bio/med journals from DOAJ and looking at overall patterns. The essay also includes four briefer discussions related to DOAJ and gold OA journals.

The Back pp. 21-28

A baker's dozen of sometimes-snarky mini-essays.

Sunday, November 02, 2014

Cites & Insights 14:11 (December 2014) available

The December 2014 Cites & Insights (14:11) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i11.pdf

This print-oriented two-column version is 34 pages long.

If you plan to read the issue online or on an ereader (tablet, notebook, etc.), you may prefer the single-column 6x9" version, available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i11on.pdf

The single-column version is 77 pages long, because the issue includes many tables, which aren't broken across columns or pages.

The issue consists of one essay, really the second part of a two-part essay (and you'll want to read the first part, in the October/November 2014 C&I or its one-column equivalent, first):

Intersections: Journals and "Journals":
Taking a Deeper Look: Part 2: DOAJ Subset and Additional Notes

If you've been reading various commentaries about Gold OA journals--including Part 1--you may be wondering where all those supposed no-fee Gold OA journals are. This piece helps to tell that story. Specifically, of 2,843 journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals as of May 7, 2014 that have an English interface version, aren't from either OASPA members or Beall-list publishers, and are not about aspects of medicine or biology--and that actually published one or more articles between January 2011 and June 30, 2014--more than 78% do not charge fees of any sort, and those journals published 53% of the articles published by the whole group during that period. Those percentages grow to almost 92% and more than 81%, respectively, for 1,426 journals in the humanities and social sciences.

This article looks at the "DOAJ set" in depth, including new tables that show distribution of articles (and journals publishing articles during a year) on a year-by-year basis, including the percentage of free journals and articles from those journals for each year. But there's more: I also look at journals by broad topic (27 of them, in 8 even broader groups and two extremely broad supergroups), showing simplified tables for each topic within the DOAJ set and overall numbers for all three sets (OASPA, Beall and DOAJ). Broader groups are compared for all three sets.

There's a brief discussion (with two graphs) of starting dates for journals. There's a less-brief consideration of average cost per article by topic, making some simplifying assumptions Those expecting my comments on the new DOAJ criteria and my thoughts on diseconomies of scale for some kinds of OA journal will have to wait for the January 2015 C&I, which will also look at (at least some of the) DOAJ journals omitted this time around.